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THE PALEO-OSTEOLOGICAL BIKE RACK by michael bahl





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THE PALEO-OSTEOLOGICAL BIKE RACK


Material: To be cast in bronze
Size: 4 ft H X 12 ft W X 3 ft D

St. Paul Artist to Create Unique Sculpture/Bike Rack

Artist Studio is Open to the Public During Art Crawl

Artist Michael Bahl will produce a landmark sculpture for the bicycle community of St. Paul, with new funding from the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation. His project is to create the bronze skeleton of a large imaginary mammal resting on its elbows in repose. The skeleton's ribcage will function as a bike rack. A bony crest on the dome of its skull will suggest the form of a bike helmet. This project has received a matching grant through the foundation's Knight Arts Challenge.

In his role as Paleo-osteological Interpreter, Michael will oversee the evolution of the skeleton/bike rack. He will begin by creating the full-sized model bone-by-bone using papier-mâché. Once complete, these light-weight yet highly durable bones will be used to form the molds for producing the bronze casts.

"Michael seems to have found a way to reach a diverse group of people by touching a whimsical chord we all carry but seldom get a chance to be aware of," said Chris Osgood, Vice President of Community Relations at St. Paul's McNally Smith College of Music. "His work is always greater than the sum of its parts, in large part because of his determination to welcome people into his world."

Michael Bahl's studio in Lowertown which houses his collection of skeletons and artifacts will be open to the public during the St. Paul Art Crawl on October 10, 11, & 12. Every year thousands of Art Crawlers enjoy a Paleo-osteological experience as they challenge their own imaginations. They recognize that the prehistoric skeletons they have always taken for granted as science might also be seen as works of art that they can enjoy with unanticipated and even playful enthusiasm.

The Knight Arts Challenge funds the best ideas that engage and enrich the community through the arts. For more, visit KnightFoundation.org.

Contacts:
Michael Bahl: phone 651-552-9496, michaelandgail@comcast.net

Marika Lynch: 305-898-3595, lynch@knightfoundation.org